Mammoth Memory

Georges Seurat (died 1891 age 31) – Pointillism and breaking of component colours down into separate colours

(Pronounced jawrj soe-ra)

Seurat - Spat

He used his jaw and spat (Georges Seurat) spits of dots onto the canvas.
(He didn't spit but the paintings do look like they have been spat at).

He used his jaw and spat (Georges Seurat) spits of dots onto the canvas.

The dots on the painting are what the art world call pointillism, which is the technique Georges Seurat developed. 
The technique gives you a unique play of light using tiny dabs of the paintbrush and contrasting colours to create a shimmering effect. Small spots of blue and yellow can create the look of green.
The paintings take a long time to complete using this technique. For example "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" took two years, although the painting is 3 metres (10ft) wide. Most of his scenes were depictions of Paris where he lived.

The paintings take a long time to complete using this technique. For example "A Sunny Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" took two years to complete, although the painting is 3 metres (10ft) wide. Most of his scenes were depictions of Paris where

A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, 1884

 

George Seurat created pointillism and the importance of colours being side by side.

This can be explained when you use a colour wheel. For an explanation of how the colour wheel works, see Mammoth Memory colour wheel.

This can be explained when you use a colour wheel. It is useful for students who don't know this technique to create their own colour wheel.

Nobody before had created - Artwork using pointillism 

More Info