Mammoth Memory

Log-Cabin Patchwork – A traditional patchwork technique that originated in the USA, in which strips are sewn around a central square in a special way

(Pronounced log-kah-bin)

Note: In this method light coloured strips are joined on two sides and dark coloured strips to the other two sides. The effect is to get a diagonal line with one half light and the other half dark.

To remember what log-cabin patchwork means use the following mnemonic:

The log cabin (log-cabin) was entirely covered in patchwork quilts. Each patch has a diagonal line with one half light and the other half dark.

The log cabin (log-cabin) was entirely covered in patchwork quilts. Each patch has a diagonal line with one half light and the other half dark.

Note: In this method light coloured strips are joined on two sides and dark coloured strips to the other two sides. The effect is to get a diagonal line with one half light and the other half dark.

Note: In this method light coloured strips are joined on two sides and dark coloured strips to the other two sides. The effect is to get a diagonal line with one half light and the other half dark.

For this project, you will need:

A jelly roll of fabric strips, with light and dark fabric. These usually contain 40 pieces of fabric ready cut at 2 1/2 inches by 40 inches and should be more than enough to make the 12 squares. A needle and thread, if you have access to a sewing machine, it will save a lot of time but this can be sewn by hand. Finally you'll need scissors and a ruler and a large piece of flannel fabric for the backing (43.5 inches by 58 inches).

A jelly roll of fabric strips, with light and dark fabric. These are usually ready cut at 2 1/2 inches by 40 inches and should be more than enough to make the 12 squares

Start by cutting your pieces of fabric to size. If you have a jelly roll, you'll only need to worry about length, not width. To make a square you'll need two of each size, one light and one dark.

2 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches of each colour
2 1/2 x 6 1/2 inches of each colour
2 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches of each colour
2 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches of each colour
2 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches of each colour

Start by cutting your pieces of fabric to size. If you have a jelly roll, you'll only need to worry about length, not width. To make a square you'll need two of each size, one light and one dark.

You will also need to cut two squares at 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches, one in the light coloured fabric and one in a red (or contrasting coloured) fabric. Finally, you'll need to cut a dark piece of fabric 2 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches.

You will also need to cut two squares at 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches, one in the light coloured fabric and one in a red (or contrasting coloured) fabric. Finally, you'll need to cut a dark piece of fabric 2 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches.

This will be the order in which you'll sew the fabric.

This will be the order in which you'll sew the fabric.

Using the running stitch technique from the Mammoth Memory kantha project, sew each of the pieces together. 

Repeat this 11 more times, so you have 12 squares in total.

Repeat this 11 more times, so you have 12 squares in total.

Sew these 12 squares together in a pattern you like. Below are some suggestions:

Sew these 12 squares together in a pattern you like. 

Then, pin your flannel fabric to your patchwork piece, making sure that they're inside out so that when sewn and flipped right way around, the stitching is hidden.

Then, pin your flannel fabric to your patchwork piece, making sure that they're inside out so that when sewn, the stitching is hidden.

Sew the two pieces together, using a running stitch, leaving an 8 inch gap so you can turn the fabric the right way round.

Then, using your flannel fabric, sew the two pieces inside out, leaving an 8 inch gap.

Turn the fabric the right way around and finish off the last 8 inches in a thread which matches the colour of the fabric to hide the stitching.

Then, using your flannel fabric, sew the two pieces inside out, leaving an 8 inch gap. Turn the fabric the right way around and finish off the last 8 inches in a thread which matches the colour of the fabric to hide the stitching

We have used plain colours for our example so the process is easier to see, but you can use patterned fabric for a more exciting quilt!

We have used plain colours for our example so the process is easier to see, but you can use patterned fabric for a more exciting quilt!

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